A
C
D
E
Light / Trade
Medium / Regular
Heavy
Extra Heavy
Massive
Extra
Heavy
Massive
Extra
Regular
Heavy
Massive
The different weight categories translated into actual weight differences as follows:
Beginning in the mid-1890s, some of the larger silver manufacturers produced their more popular silver patterns
in varying weights.  

There is no one hard and fast rule when it comes to weight marks as different manufacturers had different coding
systems.  Coding systems could also change from year to year within the same company, and not all patterns were
made in different weights.  

The different weights were applied to teaspoons and often forks and dessert spoons, never knives.  The heavier
the weight, the more silver used in producing the pieces, and the higher the cost.  Massive was the least often
produced.  Different patterns were made in different weight categories, and we have yet to see any one pattern
made in all five categories.

As the practice of using different weights started waning in the early 1940s, often only teaspoons were made in
varying weights.  By the mid-1940s, the practice was discontinued.
T
E
R or unmarked
H
M
International Silver used two different coding systems, with the
A, B, C, D and E codes being used most often:
T
R
H
E
M
Gorham started out using three different weight classifications,
Light, Medium and Heavy.  This was changed in 1898 to the
following:
T
E
H
M
Shortly after 1898 Gorham added a fifth weight category,
Regular:
Trade  = 8 to 9 Troy oz. per dozen teaspoons
Extra = 10 Troy oz. per dozen teaspoons
Regular = 12 Troy oz. per dozen teaspoons
Heavy = 14 Troy oz. per dozen teaspoons
Massive = 15 Troy oz. per dozen teaspoons
Sterling
Flatware
Fashions